Global Assurance

Garry White
Texas State University-San Marcos

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Bellamy at 4:00 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1772.html

A global economy has developed. Information is now distributed and communicated all over the world. A moved from local security to global security issues has occurred. What are new challenges that must be meet in order to assure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information on a global scale?

Corporate Boards and Technology: What they need to know

Cameron Lawrence
School of Business Administration / The University of Montana

Michael Harrington
School of Business / University of Montana

Chris Warden
CIO, Washington Corporation

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in DeRosset at 4:00 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1783.html

Effective corporate governance has emerged as a central issue in the contemporary business environ-ment. Because of regulatory issues and shareholder activism, boards have increasingly come under pressure to improve in almost all areas including member composition. Much has been written around the area of corporate governance and the scholarship in this area is becoming widely distributed. However, it appears there has been little commentary or research around the topic of corporate gov-ernance and its role in the oversight of IT function in organizations. This project intends to better link the MIS discipline with the growing research on corporate governance. This project has two distinct streams. The first is to identify the key areas and topics related to IT governance that board members should understand. The second stream seeks to analyze the composition of current Fortune 500 boards to determine the extent and nature of the technical expertise of board members.

Carolina Road House:An Undergraduate Case for Basic Excel

Michael Smith
High Point University

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Dudley at 4:00 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1789.html

The Carolina Road House will be a top-of-the-line brewpub. As building construction will finish soon, they must make decisions regarding brewing equipment. It’s not a simple problem. There are many equipment options, many makers and many distributors. They could buy new or used equipment. Some suppliers run specials. Shipping costs vary widely depending on equipment ordered and location of the supplier. The owner knows that she can’t analyze her options properly in her head so she has hired an intern who knows Excel to create a decision support tool for her. The intern finds that quotes from suppliers are relatively easy to come by compared to understanding enough about the brewing process to intelligently compare them. Then he is challenged to create a spreadsheet whose design supports playing what-if games in an environment in which quotes may change weekly and equipment from different suppliers may be combined. Thanks to his ability to teach himself whatever he needs to know about Excel, the intern discovers that making beer is as interesting as and a great deal more complicated than drinking it.

A Low Cost Green Virtual Machine Vending System

Douglas Kline
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Tyler Loftis
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Patrick Green
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Latimer at 4:00 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1787.html

Virtualization technology offers a means to help provide infrasture to meet the needs of IT instruction. We present the work-in-progress system that allows faculty and students to self-serve virtual machines for their use. Aside from the benefits of the easy provisioning of virtual machines, the entire system is based on older hardware that would normally go to a landfill, has low power consumption, and is more reliable than the previous virtualization environment.

The Value of Internships in the Information Systems Curriculum: A Case Study

Maria Harrington
Slippery Rock University

Frank Hulick
Slippery Rock University

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Skinner at 4:00 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1779.html

Within the context of the information systems academic curriculum (Landry, Daigle, Longenecker, and Pardue, 2010) and educational pedagogy, part of the aim of information systems education research is to understand how to improve students’ ability to solve real world problems with technology. Several approaches have been accepted and are commonly used that go beyond textbook, lecture, and exam. One such approach is to offer internships to students for immersion in the problem solving process of design, development and deployment of information systems for real world situations (Martincic 2009). This paper is a case study presented as a success story that describes and evaluates the undergraduate coursework and internship experience, which also resulted in the permanent placement of an information system professional.

Peter Drucker and David Allen: Toward a model of increased knowledge worker effectiveness

Cameron Lawrence
School of Business Administration / The University of Montana

Jerry Evans
School of Business / University of Montana

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Bellamy at 4:20 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1781.html

Today’s knowledge workers are embedded in extraordinarily complex and dynamic webs of information which have come to characterize the globalized business world. Much of MIS education is focused upon helping students advance their understanding of the underlying technologies and the transformative business practices that globalization has come to represent. However, little in the undergraduate MIS program or the MBA helps students to develop and cultivate the skills and habits related to “managing oneself” in the face of the extraordinary complex work environments of which they will soon be a part. Accordingly, this research project aspires to develop, advance and test a new model that is based upon Peter Drucker’s seminal work, The Effective Executive, and David Allen’s Getting Things Done, which has had significant influence in modern tech culture. This approach, which will employ the Evernote application, will be rolled out to undergraduate and graduate students this fall.

Emerging Trends and Opportunities for Hybrid Learning in Higher Education

Nita Brooks
Middle Tennessee State University

Melinda Korzaan
Middle Tennessee State University

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in DeRosset at 4:20 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1780.html

Higher educational institutions have been increasing the frequency of offering courses and degree programs in hybrid format. Typically these environments combine face-to-face and online components highlighting the role of synchronous and asynchronous learning within the same course. The focus of this paper is to explore and understand how hybrid-learning environments can be expanded to 1) create a more productive environment for educators and students and 2) provide additional opportunities for higher education. Specifically, this study will examine how students respond to virtual environments, such as Second Life, used to enhance the synchronous components of hybrid courses and how institutions can combine courses to allow students to complete more than one in a given assigned time using the online tools provided by traditional asynchronous learning environments. Additionally, data collected related to student perceptions of these environments will be analyzed as a preliminary means to exploring the ideas presented.

Analysis Of Academic Integrity Policies In A University System

Sherrie Cannoy
North Carolina A&T State University

Ewuuk Lomo-David
North Carolina A&T State University

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Latimer at 4:20 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1785.html

Plagiarism and cheating, both violations of academic integrity policies, have been an increasingly significant concern in higher education. This has been especially true because of the plethora of readily available resources on the Internet. One of the main reasons that cheating occurs is that there is a lack of education about academic integrity policies and enforcement of these policies. This interpretive study examines current policies in 16 universities in a state system to enable further understanding of the role these policies play in academic integrity concerns. This is a study in progress, which will be expanded for future research to further understand why current policy is failing to prevent academic integrity violations. It is critical that students legitimately gain the skills and knowledge so that they can achieve professional success and to preserve the credibility of academic degrees granted.

E-Learning and Distance Learning as a Sustainable Enterprise of the Future: a Business Model

Constance Serapiglia
Robert Morris University

Darcy Tannehill
Robert Morris University

Anthony Petroy
Robert Morris University

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Skinner at 4:20 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1776.html

Advances in technology and the wide use of the Internet have provided the venue for expanding on knowledge development through e-learning/distance learning. E-learning strategies have to address economical, pedagogical and technological goals. Sustainable business development involves the application of sustainability principles to business operations and for e-learning/distance learning to be successful both academically and economically; there is a need for these programs to be structured as a business operation. In implementing or expanding on an e-learning/distance learning program, the academic sector needs to close the gap between costs and generated revenues. There currently is a lack of theories and business models ensuring economically marketable and sustainable products in the corporate sector and these models are almost nonexistent in the academic arena. This paper takes a new approach for a sustainable e-learning/distance learning business model that integrates and consolidates strategic propositions concerning marketing, implementation, and projected future growth.

Strategies for Ensuring Computer Literacy Among Undergraduate Business Students: A Marketing Survey of ACBSP-Accredited Schools

Bruce Hungerford
Dalton State College

Joseph Baxter
Dalton State College

Stephen LeMay
Dalton State College

Marilyn Helms
Dalton State College

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in DeRosset at 4:40 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1784.html

College students need computer literacy for their studies and to be competitive as graduates. Colleges have traditionally used the freshman- or sophomore-level course in microcomputer applications to assure basic literacy. There has been much discussion in business schools about whether today’s entering students have enough prior experience in computer applications to omit the course, what is the proper balance of theory and application, and the appropriate format for the course. Prior research has surveyed knowledgeable faculty at Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) schools regarding computer literacy policies in their programs and respondents’ views of major influences on computer literacy programs. While the AACSB is the most prestigious accrediting organization for business schools, there is also the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). This research surveys knowledgeable faculty at ACBSP-accredited schools, reports the results, and compares them with those from a similar study of AACSB-accredited schools.

Teaching Introductory Visual Basic Using MS Team Foundation Server

Douglas Kline
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Paul Martin
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Kevin Matthews
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Tom Janicki
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Curry Guinn
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Dudley at 4:40 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1786.html

The enterprise-level application lifecycle management system, MS Team Foundation System was used in an introductory Visual Basic Programming Course for assigning projects, collecting finished projects, and grading. The system was found to add little or no cognitive overhead to the students, saved instructor and student time, and introduced version control concepts to the students.

Virtual Environments, Immersive Learning Simulations, and Serious Games as New Instructional Technology for Information Systems Students

Maria Harrington
Slippery Rock University

Saturday - 11/5/2011 in Latimer at 4:40 pm
http://proc.edsig.org/2011/abstracts/1782.html

Capstone projects and internships are acceptable educational practices and pedagogy as they provide opportunities to apply academic knowledge to business problems in context. These approaches provide experience to solve complex information systems problems. These are valuable learning experiences, as the information systems students have to apply knowledge, solve problems, and collaborate much as they would in the real world. Students provided with such immersive learning experiences and opportunities, develop skills and judgment that is highly valued by employers. Virtual environments, immersive learning simulations, and serious games all offer technology that can be used to create immersive training and learning simulations for students. Simulated real world work environments provide deeper and broader learning experiences within the safety of academic programs. This paper is an analysis, evaluation, and taxonomy of immersive learning simulations and related tools, of interest to the academic and practitioner alike.