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Thu, Nov 6, 4:30 - 5:00, Pueblo C     Paper (refereed)
Recommended Citation: Omar, A, D Kalulu, and M K S Bhutta.  Assessment of Student Outcomes in Management Information Systems Online Course Participation.  In The Proceedings of the Information Systems Education Conference 2008, v 25 (Phoenix): §1734. ISSN: 1542-7382. (A later version appears in Information Systems Education Journal 7(83). ISSN: 1545-679X.)
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Assessment of Student Outcomes in Management Information Systems Online Course Participation

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Refereed10 pages
Adnan Omar    [a1] [a2]
Department of MIS
Southern University New Orleans    [u1] [u2]
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA    [c1] [c2]

Daff Kalulu    [a1] [a2]
Department of MIS
Southern University New Orleans    [u1] [u2]
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA    [c1] [c2]

M. Khurrum S. Bhutta    [a1] [a2]
Ohio University    [u1] [u2]
Athens, Ohio, USA    [c1] [c2]

Most universities view e-learning as a step to the future. In past years, universities regarded e-learning as a strategy to increase their student enrollment, retention, and quality while lowering tuition. However, after Hurricane Katrina, several Gulf Coast universities resorted to e-learning as a means of providing basic education to their students. In fact, Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO) has chosen e-learning as an element of its quality enhancement program (QEP), to enhance the quality of education and instruction especially for first year freshmen. However, despite the administration of pre-mastery tests at the beginning of every semester along with an extensive workshop by the e-learning department, students still do not get motivated in their daily performance in a timely fashion. The reason behind this phenomenon is most likely the lack of good oriented learning, a deficiency in mentoring from K-12, and social-economic constraints on the studentsí time. As a result, administrators and scholars at SUNO have spent countless hours and resources addressing reasons for this lack of student participation. Pre-tests and post-tests were administrated to measure studentsí learning outcomes. Data was collected to analyze the lack of student involvement. The findings of this study will provide faculty members teaching online courses with ways of structuring their online courses.

Keywords: Assessment, E-Learning, Process, Participation, Student, Faculty

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